Wow, Boomerang Systems

Share:

Wow, Boomerang Systems

OK, I thought it was just another automated parking system, boy was I wrong. These guys make a system that is truly different, I think –

The garage is a standard concrete garage but with no ramps. There are little robots that scurry around under the cars following wires buried in the floor. They pick up and move cars as necessary.

Color me impressed.

Drop by their booth 1020 or look em up at www.boomerangsystems.com

JVH

John Van Horn

John Van Horn

11 Responses

  1. problem with any of these automated parking systems is that only one or two systems are in operations in the US. I visited the one by Automotion Parking Systems and it seems that they have this thing worked out and i was able to get my car back in 1:37 seconds. They also have another one in Brooklyn and i think they said one is being opened up at 24th street, in NYC. I also visted the one in Hoboken from Robotics or it’s reinvented automated system with Unitronics they still have problems making the thing work and they also dropped a car about 3 months ago. I for one, like the idea that nothing touches the car. you drive onto a plate and the plate is moved. In the other systems a vehicle is “lifted” or shuttled but in those cases something touches the vehicle. As a developer, I dont like to take any risks, I prefer a proven system in real time action with local support from a firm that has them already in operation in the US.
    Developer from New Jersey.

  2. I agree that this solution appears to be impressive, but having been in the AGV industry business I would be very interested on how they are lifting a 5,000 to 6,000 pound vehicle AND rotating in 180 degrees with a small AGV shuttle that needs to have a very small profile (~6″-8″) to slide under the vehicles. Is this impossible, no, but there are a vast amount of potential mechanical failures in this type of solution, not to mention the associated problems with wire-in-floor AGV systems. How do they handle low profile vehicles, or those that are modified with custom wheels/rims that reduce the profile further. I only suspect that those would be rejected at the entry point by some scanner, but now you are limiting the number of vehicles that can be parked. What happens with vehicles that have “hanging” exhausts? Again, I am not bashing the idea or concept, but I see far too many complications with this design than the benefits.

  3. Wow, a developer that doesn’t like to take risks. That’s a new one…
    I have asked Boomerang to respond to the comments.
    JVH

  4. We too offer our own steel “rack and rail” pallet-based systems including a basic AS/RS system with a rolling hoist that is similar in concept to the German system Automotion markets here in the U.S. You can see our pallet-based ASRS system at http://www.boomerangsystems.com/Content.aspx?nid=10&cid=2017. In our opinion, that type of system is ideal in small urban residential garages or automobile dealerships where you don’t need to retrieve more than one car at once, and where it won’t be the end of the world if the single rolling hoist servicing the garage has mechanical trouble (i.e. you can call a taxi).
    In situations, where multiple simultaneous retrievals are required, or where complete system outage is not an acceptable risk, we would recommend our other pallet-based “rack and rail” system which separates the vertical and lateral movement in different mechanisms. Our system utilizes two or more stationery hoists, and as many “roaming retrieval shuttles” as are required (or feasible) in that garage to move laterally and longitudinally to retrieve cars from and deposit cars in their storage locations.
    Our patent pending palletless robotic retrieval system which rolls on solid concrete slabs (the system that is the subject of this blog post: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOcNCGpOQXc) , is designed to provide an alternative system in municipalities where it is too challenging or expensive to gain approval for traditional steel “rack and rail” systems, for below grade garages where steel’s lack of structural support requires expensive shoring to prevent the walls from caving in, and for retrofitting certain existing self-park or valet garages.
    As for the technical concerns which were raised, we have anticipated each of them and are confident we have resolved them. Having said that, we welcome further comments, as we never assume we have thought of everything. Anything you raise that is a valid concern will be brought right to our engineering team. The nice thing about being a domestic manufacturer is that we don’t have to lobby an overseas manufacturer to develop new or improve existing products. We just do it.

  5. Good post.I agree that this solution appears to be impressive, but having been in the AGV industry business.Thanks

  6. these pages are of little, here I have discovered many things that really did not know, I thank you for the blog!these pages are of little, here I have discovered many things that really did not know, I thank you for the blog!

  7. The garage is a standard concrete garage but with no ramps. There are little robots that scurry around under the cars following wires buried in the floor. They pick up and move cars as necessary.

  8. This is a very interesting option i been looking for this so long ago and i was not able to find anthing about the subject thanks you so much for the good suggestions i really apreciated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Only show results from:

Recent Posts

A Note from a Friend

I received this from John Clancy. Now retired, John worked in the technology side of the industry for decades. I don’t think this needs any

Read More »

Look out the Window

If there is any advice I can give it’s concerning the passing scene. “Look out the window.” Rather than listen to CNN or the New

Read More »

Archives

See all Blog Posts

Send message to



    We use cookies to monitor our website and support our customers. View our Privacy Policy